To Claim, “Remedy” or not to Claim “Remedy,” What is the “Solution?”

Posted: Monday, July 26, 2010 in Born Without Money

While visiting an Internet Chat room today, once again I have heard the standardized trumpet call for remedy,” as a way to resolve ones financial difficulties.  In the “PatRIOT-world,” the vast majority of its followers have received plenty of brain entrainment to seek, demand, and claim, their remedy,” to whatever financial problems or difficulties to which they are involved.  The question is, are you certain that this is the best word to use to describe what it is that you seek?

 

A friend and brother here on the land in North Carolina has shared his thoughts on this matter, and I do agree with this findings.  Upon examination of the word “remedy,” this definition is given in the…

 

Uniform Commercial Code 1-201

General definitions:

36. “Rights” includes remedies.

A remedy is a commercial right for those who acquire that right through an instrument.

The question I asked myself was, “Do I really want to claim a “commercial right?”  In light of the fact that this, “commercial right,” is defined in THEIR codes and statutes, means that I would be subjecting myself under their jurisdiction in order to make such a claim and thereby have the remedy that I seek, yes?  Does this not mean this would become an extended privilege to me through THEIR code/jurisdiction?  Furthermore, is not a privilege given to a subordinate and can thus also be taken away from the subordinate?  I think you see my point here.  Folks, I really do not like the thought of being a subject of a jurisdiction, or of another being.  However, I do like egalitarianism very much.

 

So then, if I Am to leave the word, “remedy,” out of the equation, how would I communicate my intention so that the desired objective and outcome is realized?  The answer is the word “solution.” To ask, seek, find a, “solution,” suits my needs, and avoids trekking into THEIR jurisdictional realm and making use of a benefit-privilege extended to any and all who participate in THEIR commercial world through the usage of such privileges.

 

It is interesting to note that in the standard dictionary, it is the 3rd and 4th definitions, (especially the 4th) of the world “solution,” that fits the intended need and purpose.

 

so·lu·tion (s-lshn)

n. 1(a). A homogeneous mixture of two or more substances, which may be solids, liquids, gases, or acombination of these.

(b). The process of forming such a mixture.

2. The state of being dissolved.

3(a).    The method or process of solving a problem.

(b).      The answer to or disposition of a problem.

4.     Law Payment or satisfaction of a claim or debt. [*Winner!]

5. The act of separating or breaking up; dissolution.

 

Law Dictionaries also concur with this definition:

SOLUTION, civil law.  Payment.

1.   By this term, is understood, every species of discharge or liberation, which is called satisfaction, and with which the creditor is satisfied.

2. This term has rather a reference to the substance of the obligation, than to the numeration or counting of the money.

3.   Discharge of a contract


 



So then, “To claim “remedy” or not to claim “remedy,” which is the BEST “Solution,” for you and your peace of mind?

 

While visiting an Internet Chat room today, once again I have heard the standardized trumpet call for remedy,” as a way to resolve ones financial difficulties.  In the “PatRIOT-world,” the vast majority of its followers have received plenty of brain entrainment to seek, demand, and claim, their remedy,” to whatever financial problems or difficulties to which they are involved.  The question is, are you certain that this is the best word to use to describe what it is that you seek?

A friend and brother here on the land in North Carolina has shared his thoughts on this matter, and I do agree with this findings.  Upon examination of the word “remedy,” this definition is given in the…

Uniform Commercial Code 1-201

General definitions:

36. “Rights” includes remedies.

A remedy is a commercial right for those who acquire that right through an instrument.

The question I asked myself was, “Do I really want to claim a “commercial right?”  In light of the fact that this, “commercial right,” is defined in THEIR codes and statutes, means that I would be subjecting myself under their jurisdiction in order to make such a claim and thereby have the remedy that I seek, yes?  Does this not mean this would become an extended privilege to me through THEIR code/jurisdiction?  Furthermore, is not a privilege given to a subordinate and can thus also be taken away from the subordinate?  I think you see my point here.  Folks, I really do not like the thought of being a subject of a jurisdiction, or of another being.  However, I do like egalitarianism very much.

So then, if I Am to leave the word, “remedy,” out of the equation, how would I communicate my intention so that the desired objective and outcome is realized?  The answer is the word “solution.” To ask, seek, find a, “solution,” suits my needs, and avoids trekking into THEIR jurisdictional realm and making use of a benefit-privilege extended to any and all who participate in THEIR commercial world through the usage of such privileges.

It is interesting to note that in the standard dictionary, it is the 3rd and 4th definitions, (especially the 4th) of the world “solution,” that fits the intended need and purpose.

so·lu·tion (s-lshn)

n.
1(a). A homogeneous mixture of two or more substances, which may be solids, liquids, gases, or           a combination of these.
(b). The process of forming such a mixture.

2. The state of being dissolved.
3(a).     The method or process of solving a problem.
(b).      The answer to or disposition of a problem.

4.     Law Payment or satisfaction of a claim or debt. [*Winner!]
5. The act of separating or breaking up; dissolution.



Law Dictionaries also concur with this definition:

SOLUTION, civil law.  Payment.

1.         By this term, is understood, every species of discharge or liberation, which is called           satisfaction, and with which the creditor is satisfied.

2. This term has rather a reference to the substance of the obligation, than to the numeration or         counting of the money.

3.         Discharge of a contract


 



So then, “To claim “remedy” or not to claim “remedy,” which is the BEST “Solution,” for you and your peace of mind?

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